Switching From the Career Plan to the Career Path: 3 Lessons from an Anti-Career Guide

by | Aug 1, 2022 | Inner Wisdom

We’re back with another memo! It’s been a couple of weeks because I was working on six days of abundance activation exercises with the FSW Circle. It was so uplifting and brought some grounded energy to an otherwise overwhelming time in a lot of our lives. So, onto today’s words of wisdom!

I was “set free” when I saw that my career plan wasn’t the same as my career path…

Like so many, I was all about my career, folks—gaining the titles, org history, and stability (whatever that means). And along the journey, I realized that I couldn’t find stability in anyone else: it had to come from me. That’s where I saw my plan was different than my path. And no doubt, my path brought me ups and downs, 90* or 180* pivots, and plunges into the unknown. But that’s how FSW is with you today.

Admittedly, my LinkedIn “job title”–An Anti-Career Guide–feels a little gutsy and it’s turned or tilted some heads. The rebel inside of me is happy with that, but the old-school 9-5er is a little terrified. That’s probably the best part: knowing there’s something inside me a little unnerved means I’m pushing up against a comfort zone.

I’ve spoken to quite a few women about their comfort zones and where their hearts want to go next. So, I wanted to bring three lessons to you today, specifically related to switching from a career plan to a career path. Let’s start to unpack this!

Lesson 1: You are So Much More Than Your Career

*crickets*

I know. We’re taught from diapers to know what we want to be “when we grow up.” I remember as a child I wanted to be a vet, a paleontologist, and fit into other titles that seemed appealing.

In our 20s and our 30s, we’re still asked: “what do we do?” And in our 40s… 50s… You get the idea. This is why it can be really hard to de-condition from a feeling of, “I am my career” or “I identify as X (which is usually about the work we do).”

I’ll be honest, I was very proud of the work I did in organizations, overall. I lived and breathed that title and the expectations that went with it…Until I didn’t. Until there was a spark inside that needed something different after a couple of years in a role. And that spark led me (eventually) to finding purpose and fulfillment in new ways: via my path, not my title.

Think about your work history, my friends, and think about the spark within you that looks beyond who you are in your roles. It’s not that the roles are bad, but when we can see we’re more than our jobs, it’s a very freeing reality.

Lesson 2: When You Break Free of “The Plan” You Get to See Possibilities

I’m all about getting a game plan, but now I’m trying to balance what I’m here to do with a long game plan. It seems at odds, but I’ll unpack this a little bit.

When I had a ten-year plan, for instance, I was all about those ideologies and the conditions that came with them. I was going to have X by the time I was Y age, and I’ve had other people in my life say they did the same thing.

Today, I work from a long game plan, yes, but this plan is more like a huge forest or trail system of possibility vs. looking down in the weeds of where my steps are right now and feeling lost. Admittedly, it’s a reframe for the ego and a soulful way of living; and it’s not for everyone. There’s surrendering to this way of living, and more ebb-and-flow than what a lot of us are comfortable with.

But when we get our heads out of the weeds and look up, we get more fresh air, and we can clear our heads some more. Don’t get me wrong: weeds are useful (truly, in an ecological sense), but so is the forest of possibilities to walk through and with. It can feel overwhelming—possibilities vs. what we know right here, right now—but that’s why I try to balance the two anymore.

Lesson 3: You’ve Never Been Lost, You’ve Just Tried New Trails Over the Years

Recently, I was working on content design and was between thoughts. Then I saw this quote:

As you start to walk on the way, the way appears. ~ Rumi

Noted, Universe. Thank you.

To be honest, I think our culture of instant gratification can be a little much. It can feel high pressure to achieve what we need to achieve right now. And damned if we don’t feel ashamed or like we’re not enough if we don’t meet the metrics.

This is where we need to rebel a little bit, my friends.

Rebel against this notion that we must “know what we’re doing 24/7.” Rebel against competition with others. Honestly, this is the hardest thing I’ve ever had to learn, and am still learning.

I definitely feel “less than” when comparing where I’m at in my work vs. others (especially as an entrepreneur). Oh, I know I’m not alone. Women in my circles feel less than, too: in the orgs they’re in, with their educational level and status, not having enough by mid-career, etc. Let’s not even get into how we need to look, act, and behave, in different settings…

This is why I do the work I’m here to do. My friends, we do not have to live life this way. We don’t have to keep feeling like we’re not good enough. The only metrics I want to pay attention to now is on my soul level and raising my consciousness and collective consciousness. That’s it. Living like this does feel more like a trail system vs. a direct path, but maybe that’s how we become anti-career: we see our whole life and our wholeness in front of us in a new way.

So, let’s take these lessons and keep practicing them, in the choices we make and the actions we take. I’m here with you and that’s what my program is about. You’ll get clarity, expansion, less burnout, and sustainable possibilities for your legacy to be lived (beyond the job titles). Want to know more? Let’s talk! Hop on a call with me to learn more about the FSW program. Its doors are open and you can chat with me by clicking here!

That’s it for this week! Feeling inspired? If you’re looking for more updates and want a more direct connection, join (for free) the FSW Circle. And if you have any questions or comments, leave them below or contact me 1:1 this way. Chat with you soon!

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